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Posts Tagged ‘taxes’

Governor Rick Scott recently announced his new budget for the state of Florida. Don’t worry, socialism-haters, it does not “take from the rich and give to the poor.”

Instead, it takes from the kids and gives to the rich!

No, seriously.  The new budgets cuts over $1.7 Billion in education, and gives $1.6 billion of that to the rich in the form of tax breaks.

Thus, Rachel Maddow defines “The Rick Scott Test”:

A simple test for determining whether your quality of life and your share of the American Dream is going to shrivel significantly this year for a real economic reason or just because you have a bad governor.

We call this the Rick Scott Test because newly-elected Florida Governor Rick Scott didn’t just use a state budget deficit to justify cutting public education down to the bone… No, Rick Scott gets the bad governor test named after him because Rick Scott found a way to make huge devastating cuts to education in a way that does not help the state’s budget deficit at all.

Specifically, Governor Scott’s new Florida budget

takes more than $1.7 billion out of public schools. And instead of putting that money back into the budget, the budget gives it away in corporate and property tax breaks. So, K through 12 education gets absolutely eviscerated in the state of Florida and the money that is saved by the state no longer spending the money on the schools doesn’t close the state budget gap at all. It leaves it roughly exactly as is and instead gives the saved money away in the form of tax cuts. So, you get all of the pain and none of the gain.

Is your state about to become a much worse place to live because of an actual economic shortfall in your state? Or is your state about to become a much worse place to live because it`s just what your governor wants? It is the Rick Scott test. It`s empirical. Tax cut for dummies.

(Read the full transcript here).

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“What went wrong?” is the question we pretend to ask. But what most of us really mean is: “Whose fault is it?”

Who can we blame?

It’s important to have a scapegoat, preferably a human being or a group of them. Assigning fault is not only a soothing process; it’s one helluva way to make a political point. Got some enemies you don’t like? Wait for something horrific to happen, then hop on your “political hobby horse” and find a way to pin it on them. (more…)

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